Tag Archives: help-seeking

Today is the day.

Today is the day: my first counselling session. I would like to write about how I feel, but truthfully, I don’t feel anything. It’s been nearly five months coming, and today, I feel much like I did five months ago. Numb. Empty. And exhausted. Exhausted by the daily grind of depression, the heaviness of trying to get out of bed, the dissonance of putting on an enthusiastic face for the outside world, and the pressure of wanting to be ‘getting better’ for the people in my life who were so relieved to see me getting professional help.

I ran out of citalopram a week ago and can’t find the prescription slip to order a repeat. I could go back to my GP to get a new prescription,  but I’ve explained to myself that since I didn’t want to be on medication anyway, this is a good opportunity to see whether psychological treatment alone is enough. That’s the rational explanation. The truth is, the thought of seeing him again makes my heart beat through my chest, so I’m avoiding it.

Now today, I have to talk. But what to say? My life is good. I have a well paid, interesting job; a partner who I love deeply and have fun with; a nice flat in an area lots of people wish they could live in; good relationships with family; and lots of friends who I love and who care about me. There is no good reason for me to be unhappy. I could dig out supposedly traumatic events from throughout my life, but in my experience, that’s true of pretty much everyone. So that leaves me back where I started: what to talk about? In my last go at psychological treatment, I remember endless silences because I didn’t know what I was meant to talk about.

A couple of months ago, I requested a copy of my patient file from the psychiatrist I saw in 2004-5. It was hard seeing things written down about myself, things that I didn’t recall being spoken in the room. Words like “anorexia nervosa: partial remission”, “drunk today”, “borderline personality traits: see for further assessment”. There were also the letters between my psychiatrist and my GP, which I’d not seen before.

I feel she is suffering from a mild to moderate Borderline Personality Disorder. She describes a long history of labile mood, and has been self lacerating for the 2 years. She also bites her fingers to cause pain, and can also be reckless with spending and sex.

And a year later:

If she remains engaged in therapy she should continue to make slow but steady progress.

I dropped out of treatment a month after that last letter was written.

I feel reassured that this time I am seeing a counsellor without an official referral from my GP, so they won’t share information about me. But I know I suggested in an earlier post that it would be useful for them to share information. The point is, I want information shared in a way that includes me. I want professionals who are collaborating in my treatment with me. If they communicate, I should be copied in. Instead, I get a choice between uncoordinated treatment from two separate professionals who don’t know what the other is doing, or coordinated treatment in which I have no voice.

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My first GP appointment, transcribed.

Two weeks ago, I went to see the GP about my mental health for the first time in 7 years and I decided to audio record the interview. I was conscious that my memory of what happened would be influenced by my experience of it, so I wanted a more objective record of exactly how it went. And I wanted to be able to share it here, to give a better account of how it happened. This is my experience, not necessarily a representation of the service anyone else would get from a doctor in their local NHS practice, but it’s one example.

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GP: Hi, come in.

Me: Hi.

GP: Hi, take a seat. [inaudible].

Me: Um. [pause]. I’ve had low mood for about 18 months now and I’m just a bit tired so [laughs], I thought I’d come to the GP and talk about it and see if there’s anything I can do.

GP: Okay. So what’s been going on?

Me: Um [sighs]. I don’t know if there’s anything in particular that’s been going on, it’s just, um [pause], yeah, I dunno, it’s just kind of [pause] continuous, so I don’t know [laughs].

GP: Right.

Me: It kind of goes up and down and it’s not as bad as it has been, but…

GP: Hmm.

Me: Um, I think, last time I came to the GP it was a while ago…

GP: Yep.

Me: I was going to talk about it then but I didn’t feel able to…

GP: Right.

Me: So it’s taken me a while to come back.

GP: Okay, right.

Me: Um. [pause] I’ve had depression in the past but that was quite a while ago.

GP: Okay. Were you on medication?

Me: Yeah. I was on Zoloft, and then on Citalopram.

GP: Okay. And how long was the treatment for?

Me: Um, it was probably, I think I was on it for a couple of years.

GP: Right, okay. And then did you finish the last treatment?

Me: Um, it was 2005.

GP: 2005?

Me: Yeah, a long time ago.

GP: So you’ve been okay since then?

Me: Yeah, ah, yeah, I’ve been okay, yeah. I was fine for a long time and so, yeah.

GP: Okay. So when did this current low mood start?

Me: Um, about 18 months ago.

GP: And ah, are you able to sleep okay?

Me: Um, it, it comes and goes. It’s not so bad at the moment, but it, sometimes it, I’ll wake up in the night. Like I’m fine falling asleep, but it’s just that I wake up quite early.

GP: Right, okay. So how many hours of sleep would you say you get?

Me: Um. At the moment it’s okay, I’m getting about 7 hours of sleep at the moment…

GP: Right, okay.

Me: But other times it will be 4 or 5.

GP: Right, okay. And your appetite?

Me: Appetite is fine.

GP: [inaudible]

Me: Ah, I have lost a bit of weight, but I think that’s just because I’ve been exercising.

GP: Okay, okay. Right. And any thoughts of self harm?

Me: Ah [pause]. I think about it but it’s not something I’m doing.

GP: Right. How often do you think about it?

Me: [pause] Um. Quite a lot, like it’s always sort of there, but I.

GP: Okay, right. But you haven’t got, haven’t got any kind of plans or anything? No? Okay. But have you self harmed, cut yourself or…?

Me: I have in the past, but not this time.

GP: Not now, okay. Are you in a relationship currently?

Me: Yes.

GP: And does he support you?

Me: Yeah. I’ve spoken to my partner about it, but only recently.

GP: [inaudible] right. Now, how are your energy levels?

Me: Not great [laughs]

GP: Right.

Me: I’ve just got that feeling of being kind of heavy, all the time.

GP: Right, yeah, okay. Are you enjoying things you normally enjoy, like going out with friends and things?

Me: Not really. Like, yeah [pause]. Not as much as, everything’s just more of an effort.

GP: Right, okay, okay.

Me: [inaudible]

GP: And alcohol?

Me: Um, I’ve been managing it, it’s not too, yeah. I probably should drink less.

GP: Ah okay, right. Drugs…?

Me: No.

GP: Smoking?

Me: Oh smoking, yeah.

GP: Right, okay. Now, um, the other thing is that obviously, you know, with a history of depression and the way you are feeling as well, I think you would know [inaudible]. Now compared to the last time you started on medication…

Me: Yeah?

GP: Do you think you are feeling the same or getting towards feeling, you know, the same again?

Me: Um [pause], yeah, it’s pretty similar.

GP: Okay. Did you have any counselling or…?

Me: Yeah.

GP: You did? Okay, right. Did you find it helpful?

Me: Um [pause]. Not [pause] hmm. I, well, I had counselling and then I was referred to a psychiatrist as well…

GP: Right.

Me: It [pause]. Yeah. I think I would like counselling again, but I didn’t have a very good relationship with my psychiatrist.

GP: Right, okay. Yes. Now, with the counselling, we can refer you to our psychologist.

Me: Mmm.

GP: And the waiting period is normally a couple of months or something.

Me: Okay.

GP: But then there’s a, a place called Mind.

Me: Yeah, I know Mind.

GP: Then they can give you, you know [inaudible]. And they charge, I think it’s £5 a session.

Me: Okay, so it’s not expensive.

GP:  So I can actually give you their number, and then if you would like I could [inaudible] probably you can do…

Me: Right, okay. I might give Mind a go.

GP: Yes, you’ll get in quicker.

Me: What sort of counselling is it?

GP: Ah, I think it’s one-on-one, yeah [inaudible] they decide the number of sessions you need to do, and then in combination with that kind of treatment I think maybe we’ll start you on some antidepressants as well.

Me: Okay.

GP: Because the last time we saw you was May last year, and if at the time you were having these issues and you couldn’t talk about it and it’s still the same now, then I think we should start you on some Citalopram maybe?

Me: Okay.

GP: But it depends on you, if you want to give the counselling a go first or whether…

Me: Yeah.

GP: …or do you want to, it depends on how you feel, you know?

Me: Yeah.

GP: The thing is, I think that you are probably moderately depressed.

Me: Mmm.

GP: And drug treatment may be beneficial.

Me: Yeah. I suppose I’m not quite sure about antidepressants, I’m sort of [pause]. Yeah. Are they really effective or not, you know?

GP: Yeah they are, they are. Because for somebody who’s had depression in the past, sometimes there could be a physiological reason, or an underlying cause for it.

Me: Yeah.

GP: And it’s due to the seratonin production. Sometimes, for some reason it does not produce enough, and if it does not produce enough, there’s nothing you can do. You can try everything to lift up your mood, but it still doesn’t [inaudible]. Your body for some reason doesn’t produce enough serotonin, so therefore when you do take the medication it stops the breakdown of seratonin and therefore you take that and it elevates the mood. So it will help. The thing is, ah, [pause] you know that people, some people think, oh well it’s…

Me: It’s not a happy pill!

GP: Yeah. But we find, it depends [inaudible] initially it takes about two weeks for it to kick in and then it starts to accumulate and then the way that people realise that, you know, its effect, is when they stop.

Me: Yeah.

GP: Sometimes they’ve been taking it for a while and they’re feeling alright and then they stop and when they start getting depressed again they know, that’s when they realise it was working.

Me: Yeah.

GP: So it’s a slow, you know, kind of treatment. It takes time to build it up. But it depends if you want to give Mind a go first, or whether you want to start, you know, on the antidepressants.

Me: Um. And Mind, they usually don’t have a waiting time, is that?

GP: Ah, I think, Mind’s probably shorter than our psychologist. A week or two.

Me: Ah, okay.

GP: So if you like, you can wait and see them, that would be fine.

Me: And do they have, do you know, do they have appointments only in office hours, or..?

GP: I think probably. I think it’s probably that, 9 to 5. I mean you’ll find all the psychologists will be in office hours.

Me: Yeah. It’s a bit hard for me.

GP: Yeah.

Me: I don’t like, telling people at work that…

GP: Yeah. So that’s what it is. Now ah, it’s entirely, I think you know maybe the antidepressants are [inaudible]. Because you’ve got a strong history, a past history of depression, I think you know you may benefit from, ah, [inaudible].

Me: Mmm. [pause] Can I take a prescription and then…

GP: Yeah, I can give you a prescription now, start you out on the lowest dose, and then I’d like to see you in a couple of weeks time.

Me: Okay.

GP: And see how you’re getting on [inaudible].

Me: Yeah, okay. Thank you.

[GP typing]

GP: Are you on the pill?

Me: No. I’ve got the coil.

GP: Ah, okay. And how are your periods?

Me: Yeah, they’re fine.

GP: Not heavy at all?

Me: No, they are. But it’s been like that since I got the coil.

GP: Mmm, riiight. Because you look a bit pale to me, you know, you may have anaemia or…

[checks my eyes]

GP: Are you feeling more tired than usual?

Me: Yeah.

GP: I think we’ll just get a blood test done to check your iron levels.

Me: Okay.

GP: Because sometimes a combination of factors, you know, can actually affect your mood. You know, being tired already from iron deficiency, and that can also make your mood a bit lower.

Me: Mmm, okay.

[GP writing]

GP: And how’s your self esteem? Your confidence?

Me: Mmm, could be better [laughs]

[GP typing]

GP: Do you know which antidepressants you were on in the past?

Me: Yeah, I was on Zoloft to start with, then I changed to Citalopram.

GP: Right, okay.

[GP printing prescription]

GP: Now the Citalopram is one a day. If you take it during the day and you feel, you know, a bit tired, then take it in the evening.

Me: Okay.

GP: And then let me get you the number for Mind.

[pause]

GP: [inaudible]

Me: Okay

GP: That’s the Citalopram, 10mg is the lowest dose, and I will see you in a couple of weeks.

Me: Okay, alright, thank you.

GP: Okay

[inaudible short conversation as I’m getting up to leave]

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Preparing to disclose.

Tomorrow morning I have the appointment with my GP. Since I made the appointment, I’ve been mulling over a couple of questions: Firstly, what am I going to tell? And then, what help do I actually want?

What am I going to tell? When I moved to the UK and registered with my GP, I was asked to make an appointment with a nurse to give my medical history. I never did. Partly because I never got around to it, but also partly because I was worried about disclosing my history of mental health problems and having that on my patient record. That’s still worrying me now.

Tomorrow, I will most likely tell the doctor that I’ve been feeling low for over 18 months and that I don’t feel that I’m getting better. It’s pretty vague, and I wonder whether it will be taken seriously enough to get me the help I want. I could disclose my suicidal thoughts, but although they’re preoccupying, I haven’t got a plan right now and I know that’s the question I’ll be asked as the measure of whether things are really serious.

Alternatively, I could disclose my mental health history. This may result in me being taken more seriously, but then that information is on my patient record and every time I seek help (for anything, not just my mental health) it may be seen through the lens of those previous diagnoses – diagnoses which I actually disputed at the time. Realistically, I feel okay about disclosing that I’ve had depression and that I’ve been prescribed Sertraline and Citalopram previously. Depression feels more acceptable, normal even. It’s what most people think of when we say ‘1 in 4’ of us will have a mental health problem. But I’m not okay with disclosing that I was treated by a psychiatrist and diagnosed with BPD and a borderline eating disorder, that I have a history of cutting, nor that I was diagnosed as alcohol dependent and attended alcohol counselling and AA.

And what help do I actually want? I know that I’m tired of feeling like this, and I want to be happy again. But I’m still not convinced that the GP can offer me anything that will help me achieve this. I expect that I will either not be offered any help, or if I am, it will be either anti-depressants or a referral for a few sessions of CBT that I may have to wait months for. CBT has not been hugely helpful for me in the past and I’ve already worked my way through plenty of online resources with little result. I’m not sure what face-to-face has to add. What I really want is a referral to a therapist, sometime quite soon, and a choice of who that therapist is and what type of therapy they’re offering.

There’s actually one other question on my mind: who will I be telling? I visit my GP so rarely that I don’t know any of the doctors and they don’t know me. I don’t know if the doctor I’m going to see has any expertise in dealing with mental health, or if they hold judgemental beliefs about people with mental health problems. This makes me feel like seeking help through my GP is actually a big risk: a negative experience could set me back, rather than moving me forward. Tomorrow will tell.

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Making an appointment.

It’s Friday and I’ve got today off work. When I made the decision to seek professional help, I thought today would be the perfect day to do that. I would have the whole day off to myself, I could relax and prepare ahead of the appointment, and if it didn’t go well, I wouldn’t have anyone to put on a brave face for afterwards.

That was the plan. Since my GP practice advertises that you can get a routine appointment within 48 hours, I called on Tuesday to make the Friday appointment. So they could “deal with my call effectively”, I pressed 1 for the automated service. I prefer not to speak to a person if I can help it: people often inadvertently say the wrong thing, putting me off from following through. So I pressed 1 and it rang me through to the automated service. Except it didn’t. It just kept ringing and ringing and ringing. After about a minute, I accepted it wasn’t going to go through, hung up and rang back, this time pressing 2 to speak to a receptionist.

“Sorry, we haven’t got any appointments available on Friday.”

Oh.

“I guess you don’t have anything sooner, then?”
“No, we’re all booked up. Unless it’s an emergency. I can get you in on Friday if it’s an emergency.”

And there it was. The reason I use the automated service. That question I’ve heard from so many GP receptionists, so many times before: is it an emergency?

I never know how to respond to that question. How can I explain that I need help now, that I’ve worked up the confidence and resolve to get help now, and that if I wait, I might lose that resolve? I know that if I wait, I may end up telling myself that things aren’t so bad, that I can manage this by myself, that there’s nothing professionals can do for me that I can’t do for myself.

How do I explain that I have Friday planned out in my head, that it’s important to me that it’s Friday? If the appointment isn’t on Friday then I know I’m less likely to turn up, and if I do turn up, I’m less likely to actually disclose my mental health problems when I’m sitting there in front of the doctor. But the fact that it’s important to me doesn’t make it an emergency, does it?

And if I say it’s an emergency, what will the doctor think of me when I do disclose? I already worry about being viewed as a time-waster, an attention-seeker, a drama queen. I feel these pejorative labels keenly, associated as they are with with the diagnosis I was lumped with 8 years ago: Borderline Personality Disorder.

“No, it’s not an emergency. When do you have an appointment available?”
“I can do Monday for you?”

No good, I’ve got an all-day meeting on Monday, and I can’t be cancelling meetings for a GP appointment.

“I can’t do Monday. How about Tuesday? And do you have an early appointment?”
“I’ve got 9:40 Tuesday morning.”
“That’s fine, thank you.”

It’s not really fine. It’s a week away, 9:40 means I’ll be late for work, and I’ll probably have to put that brave face on. At least I’m never sick – everyone ‘knows’ that about me – so they’ll all assume the appointment’s something routine, like contraception or a smear.

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Help-seeking starts here.

In my professional life I often discuss help-seeking processes in the health and social care systems, and it’s something widely discussed in the mental health literature. But too often, accounts of help-seeking fail to illuminate the tiny details that actually make or break it. This blog is a personal account of my experience of seeking help for mental health problems in London.

Eighteen months ago, I found myself sitting on a bench in a park near my house, smoking a cigarette and calmly going through in my head the actions I had left on my suicide plan to-do list. Sitting there, the shock of the point I’d let myself get to hit me suddenly with a sharp, physical force. I’d been well – recovered, even – for 7 years. Yet within a couple of months of feeling low, I had a serious suicide plan.

I’d not told anyone that I was feeling low, let alone exactly how bad it was. I hadn’t told myself how bad it was. Suicidal ideation is always in the background for me, my fantasy escape route if I need it, so it was easy not to notice that it had crossed from fantasy to concrete reality.

Sitting on that bench, I realised I needed help. But from who? I didn’t want to burden my partner, who I love, with the responsibility of knowing I was suicidal. Talking to family wasn’t an option for the same reason, and none of them live in this country anyway. Having moved to the UK only a couple of years ago, none of my friends here knew my history of mental health problems and I was keen to keep it that way. The only thing I could think to do was to go to my GP and get a referral for counselling.

So back in August 2011, I made an appointment with my GP. I checked in with the receptionist, who then asked me to weigh myself on the machine in the middle of the waiting room, as well as handing me a slip of paper with a survey about my drinking. This was just routine, but at 21 I had been diagnosed with alcohol dependency and a borderline eating disorder. Already anxious about talking to the GP about my mental health, questions on my alcohol use and weight exacerbated negative feelings associated with past poor treatment from health services. By the time the GP called me in, I’d already decided not to talk. Instead, I asked for, and received, superfluous advice about a minor hand injury.

It’s taken me 18 months of not getting better to feel desperate and exhausted enough to seek help again. Three weeks ago, a friend of ours attempted suicide and I finally felt able to share with my partner exactly how bad things had got for me and how I’m feeling now. It was hard – for me to tell, and for him to hear – but his support since then has been everything I needed it to be that it hasn’t been before now.

And today, I made another appointment to see my GP. But that’s for my next post.

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